bauhaus
imaginista
Artist Text

The O Horizon

A Film produced for bauhaus imaginista

The Otolith Group, Film Still from The O Horizon.

The Otolith Group have been commissioned to produce a new film The O Horizon for bauhaus imaginista, containing studies of Kala Bhavana as well as the wider environments of Santiniketan and Sriniketan. Through rare footage of art, craft, music and dance, it explores the material production of the school and its community as well as the metaphysical inclinations that guided Tagore’s approach to institution building.

The Otolith Group, Film still from The O Horizon

Filmed, recorded and researched in Visva-Bharati campus at Santiniketan, Sriniketan and surrounding areas of Birbhum, West Bengal, O Horizon stages moments from Rabindranath Tagore’s extensive environmental pedagogy as a series of portraits, moods, studies and sketches that allude to what might be described as a Tagorean cosmopolitics. Drawing on the theories and practices of dance and song developed by Tagore as well as the murals, sculpture, painting and drawing created by artists such as K.G. Subramanyan, Benode Behari Mukherjee, Nandalal Bose and Ramkinkar Baij, whose work shaped the ethos of generations of Indian modernists - The O Horizon draws together dance, song, music and recital to assemble a structure of feeling, of the Tagorean imagination for the 21st Century.

The Otolith Group, Film still from The O Horizon

The Otolith Group, Film still from The O Horizon

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