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Bauhaus

Bela Lugosi’s Dead

Die einflussreiche Post-Punk-Band Bauhaus war maßgeblich am Entstehen des musikalischen Genres und Kleidungsstils „Goth-Rock“ beteiligt. Die Band gründete sich 1979 und auf ihrer neunminütigen Debüt-Single Bela Lugosi’s Dead findet sich ein Refrain, dem sich auch der Titel des Ausstellungskapitels Still Undead verdankt.

Bauhaus: Bela Lugosi’s Dead, 1983

Ursprünglich nach dem Gründungsjahr des Bauhauses „Bauhaus 19“ genannt, verstand die Band diese Bezugnahme, wie Bassist David Jay erklärte, als Ausdruck des Versuchs, „alles herunterzubrechen“ auf das Geradlinige, Funktionale und Schroffe, und außerdem als Hinweis auf die starke Verbindung zur Bild- und Bühnenwelt des Bauhauses.

Ein Interview mit der Band in der „Bauhaus-Nummer“ von New Sound, New Styles vom Oktober 1981 ist mit Grafiken aus „Dreieck, Quadrat, Kreis“ illustriert. In diesem Heft äußert sich der englische Autor Robert Elms begeistert über die Bauhaus-Feste sowie über „die exzentrische Aufmachung und das anarchische Auftreten“ der Bauhäusler*innen als Inspiration für eine neue Welle der Musik- und Straßenmode. Jay spürte später den in England lebenden Bauhaus-Emigranten René Halkett auf und spielte mit ihm einen Track ein, der die Geräusche eines Taschenrechners mit Halketts Gedichten mischte.

Aus New Sounds New Styles, Oktober 1981, hrsg. von Kasper de Graaf, Grafik Malcolm Garrett.

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