bauhaus
imaginista
●Edition 4: Still Undead
Sep. 21 2019–Jan. 12 2020
Ausstellung

bauhaus imaginista, Nottingham

  • Nottingham Contemporary
  • Weekday Cross
  • Nottingham NG1 2GB
  • United Kingdom

Die Edition Still Undead widmet sich der immateriellen und performativen Seite des Bauhauses, angeregt vom Reflektorischen Lichtspiel, einem Lichtapparat des Bauhaus Studenten Kurt Schwerdtfeger, 1922 für ein Bauhaus Fest entwickelt. Still Undead erforscht den experimentellen Umgang mit einer Vielzahl neuer Medien am Bauhaus in der Fotografie und im Film, mit kinetischen Skulpturen, visuellen Apparaten und Soundexperimenten. Neue Verfahren die im Exil in den Vereinigten Staaten fortgeführt wurden und weiterwirkten in der Bewegung des Expanded Cinema, in die visuelle Kommunikation sowie erste Formen der Datenvisualisierung.

Auch auf dem Gebiet der elektronischen Musik und im Windschatten des Punks wurde das Bauhaus ein Vorreiter in Sachen Grenzüberschreitung. Moholy-Nagys Utopie eines Künstler-Ingenieurs wird zum Vorbild von Bands wie Kraftwerk und anderen. Der Sturm der Bauhaus Studierenden gegen ästhetische Normen begünstigen die Aneignung durch spätere Generationen. In Großbritannien waren es Street Style, Grafikdesign und Elektronischen Musik, geprägt vom „Basic Design“, eine britische Version des Bauhaus-Vorkurs, das in den 1950er-Jahren die britischen Kunstschulen revolutioniert hatte.

Still Undead untersucht den Überschuss jener Produktionen am Bauhaus, die jenseits von Notwendigkeit und gesellschaftlichem Nutzen entstanden. Fantastische Kostümkreationen, kunstvolle Maschinen werden zum komplexen optischen Vergnügen. Still Undead fragt in welchen Bereichen diese Überschüsse des Bauhaus weiterwirken, in der Popkultur, zeitgenössische Kunst oder im digitalen Design und in die Werbung …?

●Related Articles
●Interview
Interview with Filmmaker and Photographer Ronald Nameth — On filming Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable and the influence of the New Bauhaus

Ronald Nameth has been working with film, electronics, video, and digital media from the 1960s until today. In addition to Warhol, Nameth has collaborated with several key figures in the arts including musical innovators John Cage and Terry Riley, photographers Aaron Siskand and Art Sinsabauagh, as well as many other artists and performers. In this interview with bauhaus imaginista he recalls how the New Bauhaus method of teaching allowed him to explore the nature of various media to better understand the medium itself and its creative potentials. → more

●Article
Light as a Creative Medium in the Art of György Kepes

Design works employing light refraction, fixation, and reflection were already a feature of László Moholy-Nagy’s teaching at the Bauhaus. When in the summer of 1937 Moholy followed Walter Gropius’s advice and accepted Norma K. Stahle’s invitation to head the New Bauhaus in Chicago, he lay great store by György Kepes’s help in setting up the school in the New World. → more

●Article
Vision in Motion —> Information Landscapes — From Stage Props and Camouflage Techniques to Democratic Apparatus and Cybernetic Networks

The examination of approaches, models and strategies for a redefinition of visual culture, the control of images and the shaping of perception made former Bauhäuslers interesting to the American establishment. Their knowledge was incorporated in the development of democratization tools that aid in the fight against fascism and, later, were strategically used against Eastern Bloc countries during the Cold War. → more

●Article
Bedsit Art in the Leeds Experiment

In the 1970s the city of Leeds was noted as home of “the most influential art school in Europe since the Bauhaus,” and a thriving punk and post-punk music scene. Gavin Butt explores a small art school milieu in which avant-garde experiments in photography, performance, film and sound art gave shape to non-conformist presentations of the body and of sexual and gendered identity. → more

●Article
The Bauhaus Journey in Britain

The Bauhaus's teaching approach emphasised the idea of working as a community of creatives and producers rather than merely focusing on the traditional pupil-teacher relationship. In this essay the focus will be on the Bauhaus’s impetus to bring art and design into everyday life highlighting in Great Britain’s visual culture in the 1930s and between 1960s and 70s and how it influenced youth and popular culture during the swinging sixties in London. → more

●Article
Festive and Theatrical — The Mask Photos of Gertrud Arndt and Josef Albers as an Expression of Festival Culture

Costuming played a central role at the Bauhaus. Gertrud Arndt's mask photographs (a series of 43 self-portraits) derive directly from these Bauhaus festivals. As well as a series of nine color photographs taken in direct succession at Black Mountain College in 1940 by Josef Albers. → more

●Article
Latter-day Bauhaus? — Muriel Cooper and the Digital Imaginary

The Bauhaus is a monument—a book with the physical heft to match its scholarly ambition. Published in 1969 by the MIT Press, The Bauhaus: Weimar, Dessau, Berlin, Chicago stands fourteen inches tall, ten inches wide, and two and-a-half inches thick, weighing in at over ten pounds. It is the revised, expanded, and redesigned translation of editor Hans Wingler’s 1962 German tome Das Bauhaus, 1919–1933: Weimar, Dessau, Berlin. Muriel Cooper, the MIT Press’s first Design and Media Director, consistently rated the book as one of her proudest achievements among the nearly 500 she would design or oversee during her tenure. → more

●Article
Communitas … After Black Mountain College

In the wake of Black Mountain College’s dissolution in 1954, two former students Paul and Vera Williams, left North Carolina and founded Gate Hill Artists’ Cooperative about an hour’s drive outside of New York City. “The Land,” as the Coop was often called by the artists, composers, filmmakers, choreographers, poets, and potters who built their homes and studios in this rural setting, evinced many of the pedagogical lessons of the Bauhaus translated through the American educational experiment in combining art and life that was Black Mountain College. → more

●Audio
Bauhaus — Bela Lugosi’s Dead

The influential post-punk band, Bauhaus, helped invent the musical genre and sartorial style of goth-rock. Formed in 1979, their nineminute-long debut single Bela Lugosi’s Dead includes a refrain that has also inspired the title for the exhibition chapter Still Undead. → more