bauhaus
imaginista
●Edition 1: Learning From
Jun. 7–9 2018
Workshop and Symposium

bauhaus imaginista: Learning From, New York

  • Goethe-Institut New York
  • 30 Irving Place New York, NY 10003, USA

Lena Bergner, Draft of a hand loom, 1936–39
Bauhaus Dessau Foundation, © Heirs to Lena Bergner.

A three-day workshop and public seminar explored questions of appropriation, representation and ‘learning from’ in the work of Bauhaus emigres and their students who studied and collected a wide range of objects and materials indigenous to the Americas.

Rose Slivka, "New Tapestry", in: Craft Horizons, March/April 1963, © American Craft Council

This workshop considered the use and context of these objects in their original setting, the historical circumstance of indigenous people at the time these collections were being made, and how this research relates to a discussion of indigenous culture today?

A group of artists, designers, curators and art historians including indigenous scholars examined this history in relation to form and technique as well as ethics. This working group made site visits to museums archives and studios in New York, including the American Museum of Natural History, the Metropolitan Museum and the Lenore Tawney Foundation, to examine and discuss materials ranging from Mesoamerican artefacts to the work of the mid-century artists and designers who found inspiration in these collections. This study tour was followed by a public seminar at the New York Goethe-Institute.

bauhaus imaginista is realized by the Bauhaus Cooperation Berlin Dessau Weimar, the Goethe-Institut and Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW).

The symposium in New York is curated by Marion von Osten and Grant Watson in collaboration with the Goethe-Institut New York and the researchers Elissa Auther(NYC) and Erin Alexa Freedman (NYC).

●Event documentation
●Symposium Programme
bauhaus imaginista: Learning From, New York

This symposium, part of bauhaus imaginista, an international research project to mark the school’s centenary, will ask what it means to take cultural materials and inscribe them within a new context, whether this is done by the 19th-century ethnographic museum, the avant-garde artist, the mid-century teaching collection or in contemporary art. → more

●Slide Show
Photo documentation of the symposium in New York
●Video
Disappeared Quipu — Performance by Cecilia Vicuña for bauhaus imaginista
●Location
Location of the public seminar in New York

The bauhaus imaginista: Learning From public seminar was hosted by Goethe-Institut New York, USA. → more

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Anni Albers and Ancient American Textiles

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Andean Weaving and the Appropriation of the Ancient Past in Modern Fiber Art

Ancient and indigenous textile cultures of the Americas played a critical role in the development of the work of fiber artists who came of age in the U.S. in the late 1950s and 1960s. Anyone who has studied fiber art of this period, myself included, knows this well. They openly professed an admiration for traditions ranging from Navaho weaving, to the use of the backstrap loom in Mexico and Central America, to the ancient weaving techniques of Peru. → more